Dark Pages of History

POLITICS AND RELIGIONS ARE THE WORST ENEMIES OF HUMANITY – These monsters have taken millions of human lives.

Ongoing Armed Conflicts

Politics based Conflicts

War should be understood as an actual, intentional and widespread armed conflict between political communities, and therefore is defined as a form of political violence or intervention.

Religion based Conflicts

According to the Encyclopedia of Wars, out of all 1,763 known/recorded historical conflicts, 123, or 6.98%, had religion as their primary cause. Matthew White’s The Great Big Book of Horrible Things gives religion as the cause of 11 of the world’s 100 deadliest atrocities.

2011 – 2020

380,636 to 585,000 humans have been killed in this ongoing Syrian Civil War per SOHR. Estimated ≥7,600,000 internally displaced & ≥5,116,097 refugees (July 2015/2017). The war is the second deadliest of the 21st century.

9/11

The attacks resulted in 2,977 victim fatalities, over 25,000 injuries, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage. Additional people have died of 9/11-related cancer and respiratory diseases in the months and years following the attacks.

2003 – 2011

According to Iraq Family Health Survey 151,000 violent deaths occurred during March 2003 to June 2006, according to Lancet survey 601,027 violent deaths out of 654,965 excess deaths occurred during March 2003 to June 2006 and according to PLOS Medicine Survey 460,000 deaths in Iraq as direct or indirect result of the war including over 60% of deaths directly because of violence occurred during March 2003 to June 2011. The Iraq War was a protracted armed conflict that began in 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a United States-led coalition that overthrew the Iraqi government. The conflict continued for much of the next decade as an insurgency emerged to oppose the occupying forces and the post-invasion Iraqi government. About 151,000 to 600,000 Iraqis were killed in the first three to four years of conflict.

1975 – 1990

120,000 to 150,000 humans were killed in 25 years Lebanese Civil War. The Cold War had a powerful disintegrative effect on Lebanon, which was closely linked to the polarization that preceded the 1958 political crisis, since Maronites sided with the West while leftist and pan-Arab groups sided with Soviet-aligned Arab countries.

1955 – 1975

1,326,494 to 4,249,494 [Vietnamese Civilian Dead: 627,000 to 2,000,000, Vietnamese total dead: 966,000 to 3,812,000, Cambodian Civil War dead: 275,000 to 310,000, Laotian Civil War dead: 20,000 to 62,000, Non-Indochinese Military dead: 65,494] humans were killed in 20 years Vietnam War. The war, considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some, lasted 19 years, with direct U.S. involvement ending in 1973, and included the Laotian Civil War and the Cambodian Civil War, which ended with all three countries becoming communist in 1975.

August 1945

The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement. The two bombings killed between 129,000 and 226,000 people, most of whom were civilians, and remain the first and only use of nuclear weapons in armed conflict.

1939 – 1945

Over 61,000,000 [Military dead: 16,000,000, Civilian dead: 45,000,000] humans were killed in 6 years World War II. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 70 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

1936 – 1939

149,213 to 2,000,000 humans were killed in 3 years in Spanish Civil War. Because of the international political climate, the war had many facets and was variously viewed as class struggle, a war of religion, a struggle between dictatorship and republican democracy, between revolution and counterrevolution, and between fascism and communism.

1917 – 1922

7,000,000–12,000,000 humans were killed, including civilians and non-combatants in 5 years Russian Civil War.

1914 – 1918

9,525,000 humans were killed [Military dead: 5,525,000, Civilian dead: 4,000,000, Military wounded: 12,831,500] in 4 years World War I. Contemporaneously described as “the war to end all wars”, it led to the mobilisation of over 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with about nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths because of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

1800 – 1899

Major conflicts include the Napoleonic Wars in Europe, the American Civil War in North America, the Taiping Rebellion in Asia, the Paraguayan War in South America, the First Italo-Ethiopian War in Africa, and the Australian frontier wars in Oceania.

1500 – 1799

Major conflicts of this era include the Thirty Years’ War in Europe, the Kongo Civil War in Africa, the Qing conquest of the Ming in Asia, the Spanish conquest of Peru in South America, and the American Revolutionary War in North America.

1639 – 1651

315,000 – 868,000 humans were killed in 12 years War of the Three Kingdoms (British Civil Wars) between Kingdoms of England, Ireland and Scotland.

1618 – 1648

3,000,000 – 11,500,000 humans were killed in 30 years Thirty Years’ War in Central Europe.

1568 – 1648

600,000 to 700,000 humans were killed in 80 years Eighty Years’ War in The Low Countries (worldwide colonial warfare).

1562 – 1598

2,000,000 to 4,000,000 humans were killed in 36 years French Wars of Religion in Kingdom of France.

1524 – 1525

100,000 to 200,000 humans were killed in 1 year German Peasants’ War in Parts of German speaking Central Europe, especially what is now Germany, Alsace, Switzerland and Austria

Acknowledgement: Above information has been derived from the articles in Wikipedia. We are thankful to Wikipedia and to the contributors of these articles.

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